Global Apron Love

For a while I’ve been thinking about the universality of aprons, and how in every major language, there is a word for apron

tablier – French

schutzblech – German

grembiule – Italian

エプロン – Japanese

앞치마 – Korean

avental – Portuguese

фартук – Russian

delantal – Spanish

停機坪 – Chinese

and that everyone, everyone (!) knows what an apron is and everyone has a story to tell.

Such musing has finally become a new apron initiative, where I will share aprons and stories collected from around the world. I’m very excited to debut…GlobalApron_logo_final [800x600]_thumb[3]

by Marianne Katte

I was born into a family nuts about boat races. Both my parents were quite into water sports (Father rowed in an 8-man boat and Mother was a member of the Otter swim club), and my grandparents had a villa on the Dahme where regattas were held.

In 1936, the family had the chance to attend the Berlin Olympics. Everyone went, except for my mother, who was pregnant with me. In those days, pregnant women did not go out, so mother was pretty much housebound. Had it been winter, she could have worn a large coat, but there was no such camouflage in the summer. So she stayed home, and never really forgave me for it.

woman & baby by tub [640x480]_thumb[4]

Mother (Eva Erika Ilse Katte, nee Lehrmann, at age 21) worked very hard to be the perfect housewife; she even ironed my diapers. In this photo, she is wearing a kittelschuerze – a full apron – to protect her clothing while bathing me. Berlin, 1937

Little girl and baby in aprons [640x480]_thumb[3]

My cousin Sigrid and me, dressed in dirndls and aprons. Berlin, 1938. I was so blond that I had practically no hair showing, and it was a trial for me because I also wanted to have such a wonderful bow in my hair.

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globalapron™ stories and pictures are welcome & may be submitted via my website. The direct link is here. I’ll contact you when your story will be posted.

I’m always seeking to connect through the humble icon. I hope you will enjoy this new segment of my apron journey.

xxea

P.S. I must note that the globalapron™ logo is the design of graphic artist Mackenzie Miller. She is also responsible for my adorable Tie One On button. I’m such a visual person and Mackenzie deserves this shout out.

Oh! And there is time left to enter to win the Sew-Lovely Giveaway and the $25 amazon certificate courtesy of Kate Kelly. Entry for both giveaways here.

Tie One On…an apron, of course!

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